Well here we go into a new year!  It seems as though I just got used to writing 2013!  Now I have to work on 2014!  Cheers to cognitive flexibility and learning!

celebrate pic 1-14

The last discussion of 2013 was about vision statements that answer the question of “Why we are here?”  As your organization embraces CARF preparation it is important to understand where the mission statement and core values fit in. So, let’s explore the mission statement and core values.

The mission statement talks about the present and defines how you will get to where you want to be.  What you do may change as time goes by but will always tie back to the vision for the organization/program.  Doctors may not know it, but they do care about the mission statement because it answers the question, “What do we do?” Many of us are most comfortable with the here and now and have a large investment in what we do as it impacts our day-to-day lives.  Put in this context, doctors are usually quick to get involved in a discussion about the organization’s/program’s mission!

With vision and mission statements covered, what are core values and where do they fit in?  Core values are several statements that describe the principles that drive the organization’s/program’s internal conduct as well as its relationship to the world. The core values encompass the ethics, principals, and beliefs of the organization/program.

Hmmmm…….adding core values to the mix always confuses me.  However, I have found that if I pay attention in the world, many of the companies that we regularly deal with put these principles out to the world. For example, I found myself ordering boots for me during the holidays (when I was supposed to be shopping for my family, what is that about?). The boots arrived from Zappos.com and as I excitedly, albeit somewhat embarrassed, tore open the box, I noticed on the side of the mailing box, “Zappos Family Core Value #8: Do More With Less.”

Core values are probably absolute and unalterable principles such as honesty, respect, and continual self-improvement. I think when we stop to think about what principles drive our organization’s/program’s internal conduct as well as its relationship to the world, they are pretty easy to identify.

Clearly vision, mission, and core values work in harmony.  The vision statement describes what the organization/program wants to be in the future, the mission statement describes what the organization/program wants now, and the core values guide an organization’s/program’s internal conduct as well as its relationship with the external world.

Mission-vision-core values

If you need help in engaging your doctors with creating the vision, mission, and core values, contact Donna Jo Blake, MD, BRB Consulting, Inc. for physician-to-physician guidance and training.  As your doctors take ownership of the vision, mission, and core values of the organization/program, they will become more effective program advocates and leaders.

 

We have a “vision statement”, so what?

I thought I’d write about “vision statements” today because this comes up so often in discussions with leadership, especially when discussing where to place resources. It’s an important concept but how many of us have been taught to write a vision statement or to even think in these terms?  I know most doctors I’ve talked to about a “vision statement” for their organization or program are bored as soon as the words leave my lips!

But doctors do care about the vision of their organization/program, because they care about the future of that organization/program!

The vision statement answers the question of “Why are we here?” It paints a vivid and clear picture of the future of the organization and/or program.  As described by Simon Sinek in his Framework of the Golden Circle, the clarity of WHY provides purpose, cause or belief and serves as the single driving motivation for action. (http://www.startwithwhy.com/portals/0/why_u_course/pdfs/c1_framework.pdf)

The vision statement communicates to the world the reasons for what we do and does not change when the market changes. The vision statement talks about the organization/program’s future.  As you and your doctors communicate with leadership, stakeholders, persons served or one another you must know why you exist!

If you need help in engaging your doctors with creating the vision statement, contact Donna Jo Blake, MD, BRB Consulting, Inc. for physician-to-physician guidance and training.  As your doctors take ownership of the vision of the organization/program, they will become more effective program advocates and leaders.

 

Happy autumn!  This is my favorite time of year with crisp temperatures and beautiful colors! I’ve gotten to travel some this autumn and see how autumn dresses in different parts of the country.  This is the Animas River near the  San Juan Mountains.

Autumn in the Rockies

In my travels, a couple of weeks ago, I was discussing the future processes for provision of rehabilitation services with a group developing a new rehabilitation facility. Someone in the group asked what “processes for provision of services” meant. The question made me hesitate because I thought it was obvious. (I thought I knew what I was talking about…..but….) .

 

Process Picture

Yikes! After I did a little research about processes for provision of services I realize that this is not an obvious concept. Each of us doctors has our own experiences with processes for provision of services that began when we were medical students. These experiences were primarily within the curative model of care. As we are now providing physical medicine & rehabilitation care, we work in a model of care that may include some curative aspects of care but definitely includes restorative care. So…….what processes for provision of services are used?

I think for the doctors in your program/organization, what is important is that CARF expects that an interdisciplinary, patient-centered approach be used.

If you need help in assisting your doctors understanding of interdisciplinary, patient-centered services contact Donna Jo Blake, MD, BRB Consulting, Inc. for physician-to-physician guidance and training.

 

I picked the “scope of services” as my discussion topic today because I am frequently surprised that the really smart doctors who I interview during CARF surveys are perplexed by questions regarding their scope of services.  I have found that with simple conversation about what these doctors do and…..maybe….a few leading questions, the doctors usually discover that in fact they do know their scope of services.

Why is scope of services such an alien concept to doctors?  I don’t know for sure but I think it is most often that the doctors are not familiar with the concept of “scope of services” rather than they do NOT KNOW what services are provided and not provided by their program/organization.

Below I have provided a basic description of scope of services.  Share this with your doctors and then get your doctors involved in defining the “scope of services” for their programs/organization.

ScopePicture

The scope provides information that helps describe what services the program/organization has to offer. The scope distinguishes the program/organization so that persons served, families, or referral sources can determine whether the services offered would meet their needs, in what setting the services are offered, the hours and days the services are provided, and fees involved.

Why should the doctors be involved in defining the scope of services?

  • Doctors provide the medical care for the scope of services offered by your program/organization. Their knowledge and skills play an important role in defining the scope of services.
  • Doctors working in physical medicine and rehabilitation depend on a team to provide comprehensive services.  They must know what is and is not available for their patients.

Once you and your doctors have defined the scope of services offered, then it is important that you share this information with interested parties. Interested parties include persons served, families/support systems, referral sources, payers and funding sources, and the general public.

Now that the doctors are clear about the scope of services, get them involved in sharing this information with those folks critical to your program’s well-being and growth. Doctors can be a powerful force in getting the word out!

If you need help in engaging your doctors with defining the scope of services, contact Donna Jo Blake, MD, BRB Consulting, Inc. for physician-to-physician guidance and training.

 

Stakeholders – Do your doctors know them?

Stakeholders are the individuals or groups who have an interest in the activities and outcomes of your organization and its programs and services.

Why are stakeholders important?

  • Stakeholders are critical to the health of organizations and programs.
  • Without stakeholders’ interest, satisfaction, and support of services, there would be no demand for your services and your programs would not survive!
  • High stakeholder interest, satisfaction, and support of programs reinforce your services and the programs as essential.

Why should your doctors get to know your stakeholders?

  • Doctors are in natural leadership roles as the medical directors of your programs
  • A strong relationship between your doctors and stakeholders arms the doctors with information to support your services and implement change

Get your doctors involved with your stakeholders!

If you need help in engaging your doctors with stakeholders, contact Donna Jo Blake, MD for physician-to-physician guidance and training.  As your doctors become better acquainted with stakeholders and the role stakeholders play in the health of the organization, your doctors will become more effective program advocates and leaders.

 

A change in executive leadership in any organization can be a very challenging time. Businesses should create a succession plan that will prepare for such a change, (whether planned or unplanned) to ensure the stability and accountability of the organization.  A succession plan will guide your business through the transition. BRB Consulting would love to help your business develop a succession plan! Please contact us for more information!

 

As a follow up from our last two posts, BRB Consulting has strategies five and six to consider when conducting a performance appraisal.

Strategy five is to discuss options for further growth and development. Even if the employee does not bring this up, you need to have thought about this ahead of time. Employees who are given opportunities for growth and development tend to be productive, motivated employees.

The final strategy is to provide management with information to make job assignment and compensation decisions. If you have the “perfect employee” for a promotion that may become available in your company, or a special assignment, you need information from the performance appraisal to support your suggestion.

Want more information on performance appraisals? Please contact us for more information.

 

As a follow up from our last post, BRB Consulting has two more helpful strategies for you to consider when conducting a performance appraisal.

Another  strategy is to recognize and comment on exceptional performance. A performance appraisal is definitely the time to document when an employee has done something amazing.  Don't be shy, provide examples!

After documenting exceptional performance, the next step is to listen to the employee’s opinions about his/her own performance.  Employee self evaluations usually fall into two types of categories: those who think they exceed in every single area that they are being evaluated on, and those who think they are under-achieving in all areas. Your job as the person administering the performance appraisal is to assess where an employee's self awareness is, and work with the employee accordingly to help create a more balanced self perception.

Stay tuned for two more strategies, if you are counting those are  five and six. We will share more in a week or two. Please tell us what you think or contact us for more information.

 

So…do you ever struggle with this?

We have had challenges with employee appraisals as well. BRB Consulting is please to offer you some proven strategies that work!

The first strategy is to provide each employee a clear understanding of  job standards and expectations. Employees cannot perform the functions of their job if they do not have a clear understanding of what is expected of them. It is really important to give all new employee a thorough orientation at the time of hire.

That means taking the time  to explain exactly what you want them to do and what their job really is..a little time invested in the beginning makes a world of difference.

Of course, that means implementing the second idea from the get go!

Strategy two is to communicate honestly and frankly on performance that needs improvement.  Most managers are very uncomfortable speaking to an employee about a performance issue.  It is okay to start with all the positive areas of an employee's performance, and then confidently  lead into those where there are issues, making sure you can provide examples. Together you can decide on the plan of action.

Yes- we will share more in a week or two. Please tell us what you think or contact us for more information.

 

Preventing negative events is a challenge. That is why folks often say – Risk Management is everyone's responsibility!

Next week in Philadelphia, the Risk Management conference is being held

. For more information about that- click  RIMS 2012.

EZ-Rest and STOWnSee MAX will both be sharing how their products help prevent injuries.  What does your organization do to increase safety? Should you do more? Maybe?

Check back next week to see what we learned.

Meanwhile, be safe out there!